zm.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs

Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Browning the farro imbues it with a nutty flavor—a step you can add any time you prepare the grain.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium carrots, peeled, chopped
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt plus more
  • 5 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • 1½ cups semi-pearled farro
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped, divided
  • 6 oz. maitake mushrooms, torn into 1” pieces
  • ½ bunch Tuscan kale, center ribs and stems removed, torn into 1” pieces
  • 1 Tbsp. colatura (anchovy sauce) or fish sauce (nam pla or nuoc nam)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 2 large eggs or 1 duck egg
  • 1 red chile (such as jalapeño or Fresno), seeded, coarsely chopped
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Crushed red pepper flakes

Recipe Preparation

  • Place carrots and chile in a small heatproof bowl. Bring vinegar, sugar, 1 tsp. salt, and ½ cup water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Pour over carrots and chiles; let sit at least 30 minutes. Drain, reserving ¼ cup pickling liquid.

  • Meanwhile, heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add farro and half of garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until farro is dark brown, 8–10 minutes. Add 6 cups water and bring to a boil. Boil farro until tender but still firm to the bite, 25–30 minutes. Drain; let cool.

  • Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and cook, tossing often, until soft and just starting to brown, 5–7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a plate. Add 2 Tbsp. oil, then kale and remaining garlic to skillet. Cook, tossing often, until kale is wilted, about 4 minutes. Add colatura, farro, mushrooms, and pickled carrots. Cook, tossing often, until warmed through, 5–7 minutes; season with salt and pepper and reserved pickling liquid. Mix in parsley; divide among bowls.

  • Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a small nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Crack eggs into skillet and fry until egg whites are set but yolks are still soft and runny, about 3 minutes (slightly longer for duck egg). Top farro with eggs and scallions; season with red pepper flakes. Just before serving, break up eggs and mix into farro.

  • DO AHEAD: Carrots can be pickled 2 weeks ahead; cover and chill.

Recipe by Joshua McFadden & Sara Kramer,Photos by We Are The Rhoads

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 350 Fat (g) 15 Saturated Fat (g) 2 Cholesterol (mg) 70 Carbohydrates (g) 59 Dietary Fiber (g) 8 Total Sugars (g) 4 Protein (g) 11 Sodium (mg) 620Reviews SectionHeart bowl food well thought out. Wanted to make this as described but did not have the kale. I substituted shredded Brussel Sprouts. I had too many Maitake mushrooms but wanted to use them up. End result; oh soon good and will make again.mary bullardLawrence Kansas02/26/19

The Bitten Word

Readers of The Bitten Word cooked every recipe in the September 2013 Bon Appetit magazine. Here's their take on Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs.

Lara: We loved the earthiness of the mushrooms and faro contrasted with the acidity of the pickled carrots. We are not fans of "runny eggs". So I took one picture with eggs and then scooped them off to serve to my family. A great grainy side dish.

Krista: If you're following Bon Appetit's recipe online, take note: not included in the ingredient list are 2 medium carrots, chopped. Despite the intimidation factor of the pickling, prep and cooking are surprisingly quick and painless. If you're already a fan of grain salads, you'll enjoy it, but if (like me) you're not, don't expect to be converted by this recipe.

Craig: My first time making farro. Like most grains, the farro is really just a vehicle for other flavors. Luckily, one of those flavors for this dish was runny egg! I love runny eggs. On burgers. On pasta. On Mexican. You name it. The dish had some other bold flavors as well to punch up the farro. The mushrooms provided a meaty, earthy note and the carrots and pepper provided some crunch. My special lady friend is no fan of mushrooms, and my kids are picky eaters, so it's not likely I'll make the dish again anytime soon, but it was nice change of pace.

Alix: What a fun challenge! I haven't stuck so closely to a recipe since high school, so it was a good exercise to follow instructions. I did sub out the fish sauce for this vegetarian mock-fish sauce recipe (http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-vegan-fish-sauce-130535), which I think worked pretty well. The meal was delicious! I never would have sought out maitake mushrooms, or used farro or parsley in a fried rice style recipe. One problem with the recipe was that Bon Appetit didn't tell me how many carrots to pickle, so I made a ton. Okay, so that's not really a problem. Yum.

Mark: Locating colatura was a bitch two Italian import retailers and two paisan wholesalers were clueless. Found it on Amazon.com to the tune of $3.75 per tablespoon. The maitake mushrooms which Whole Foods held for ransom at $1.00 per ounce kept me on track for doing the recipe exactly as written, but not even Whole Paycheck had duck eggs so I had to settle for the free range beauties from a local farm. Bottom line: this dish is phenomenal -- OMG, those pickled carrots are a genius addition!

Comments

Readers of The Bitten Word cooked every recipe in the September 2013 Bon Appetit magazine. Here's their take on Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs.

Lara: We loved the earthiness of the mushrooms and faro contrasted with the acidity of the pickled carrots. We are not fans of "runny eggs". So I took one picture with eggs and then scooped them off to serve to my family. A great grainy side dish.

Krista: If you're following Bon Appetit's recipe online, take note: not included in the ingredient list are 2 medium carrots, chopped. Despite the intimidation factor of the pickling, prep and cooking are surprisingly quick and painless. If you're already a fan of grain salads, you'll enjoy it, but if (like me) you're not, don't expect to be converted by this recipe.

Craig: My first time making farro. Like most grains, the farro is really just a vehicle for other flavors. Luckily, one of those flavors for this dish was runny egg! I love runny eggs. On burgers. On pasta. On Mexican. You name it. The dish had some other bold flavors as well to punch up the farro. The mushrooms provided a meaty, earthy note and the carrots and pepper provided some crunch. My special lady friend is no fan of mushrooms, and my kids are picky eaters, so it's not likely I'll make the dish again anytime soon, but it was nice change of pace.


Crispy rice and egg bowl with ginger-scallion vinaigrette

It’s really unfortunate timing, because we’ve got a long year to go and I at one point had many great and luminous cooking plans for it, but they’re all cancelled now because on the afternoon of January 4th, before 2019 had really even kicked in, I ate the best thing I had or will all year or maybe ever — because what would the internet be without some unnecessary melodrama — and I threw it together from a mess of leftovers in my fridge.


Don’t you hate it when those lifestyle guru-types tell you about the meals they threw together from their leftovers, which just happen to be in tip-top shape, chromatically balanced, and Instagram-perfect. In real life, or at least mine, leftovers are a lot of Let’s Never Speak About That Again, the best of intentions cut short by poor planning, the now shamed and guilt-ridden humans responsible for the disgrace vowing to do better by that murky bag of herbs and liquefied cucumber next time.

But not last week. Last week, on January 1st, I made David Chang’s Bo Ssam, something I do once a year or so when I want to make a jaw-dropping feast for a crowd with exactly three ingredients (pork shoulder, salt, sugar) even a person living through the aftereffects of an evening of daquiris can handle. Of course, because most three-ingredient recipes are a lie, there are a few other things you make to serve with it: a Ssam sauce (it’s like a vinaigrette), a ginger-scallion sauce (a riff on the classic Cantonese sauce), rice, and I always like to serve it with marinated julienned carrots and thinly sliced cucumbers so needless to say, these leftovers were well above-average. Bo Ssam makes a lot we ate it on the 1st, the 2nd, and the 3rd before we were finally out of pork, but I still had a smidge left of everything else so for lunch on that 4th day of the year, I put it all in a bowl and topped it with a crispy fried egg.

But first, I crisped the rice. The world of crisped, stuck-pot, scorched, fried, bimbimbap-ed, tahdig-ed and socarrat rice is vast and nuanced and fascinating and I’m not going to even try to do it justice here, but what they all have in common, what they all know, is that cooked rice that’s been allowed to crisp is a glorious thing. My favorite — short-grain brown or white rice — is particularly good at this, starchy and thick enough to be both crackly edged and tender-centered in a single grain. (What a showoff.) It, apparently, smells like popcorn when you cook it.

I have told every single person I’ve seen or spoken to since about how amazing this lunch was (their eyes mostly glazed over, it’s fine, I understand) and now it’s your turn. I’ve tried to pare it down to just the most essential parts — crispy rice, a crispy egg, and a ginger-scallion-sauce-meets-vinaigrette — plus whatever crunchy or leftover vegetables you have around. I hope it becomes your new favorite 2019 meal, too.

Previously

And for the other side of the world:
Six Months Ago: Bourbon Peach Smash
1.5 Years Ago: Confetti Party Cake
2.5 Years Ago: Peaches and Cream Bunny Cake
3.5 Years Ago: Green Beans with Almond Pesto
4.5 Years Ago: Sticky Sesame Chicken Wings

Crispy Rice and Egg Bowl with Ginger-Scallion Vinaigrette

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 10 minutes
  • Source: Smitten Kitchen

While this is best with leftover rice, cold from the fridge, I made some fresh and cooled it to almost room temperature and it was, in fact, almost perfect (and it crisps faster). I really like the starchiness of short-grain white and brown rice here I did not test this with long-grain rice but have crisped longer-grain rice in other recipes with success. This recipe presumes 3/4 cup cooked rice per person adjust it to your preferred serving size, if this is not it.

This recipe has many things in common with dolsot bibimbap, which is served in a sizzling stone bowl that crisps the rice, and is often with a raw egg (which cooks in the hot rice) or meat, and fresh and pickled vegetables — although this is in no way intended as what would be a very lazy imitation. But if you love the flavors of bimbimbap, you will definitely like what’s happening in this fridge-scavenged hybrid recipe.

  • 1 1/4 cups minced scallions, both green and white parts (from a 4-ounce bundle)
  • 2 tablespoons minced or finely grated fresh ginger
  • Neutral oil (such as grapeseed, safflower, or sunflower)
  • 1/4 cup sherry or rice wine vinegar
  • Fine sea salt
  • About 1 heaped cup julienned or coarsely grated carrots (from about 8 ounces fresh)
  • 8 ounces small (Persian-style, about 2) cucumbers, thinly sliced
  • 3 cups cooked, cooled rice (my favorite here is short-grain brown or white)
  • 4 eggs
  • Soy sauce or tamari (to serve)
  • Toasted sesame oil (to serve)
  • Sriracha, gochujang or another hot sauce of your choice (to serve)

Crisp your rice: Heat a large frying pan over medium high. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons oil you’ll want to coat the bottom with a thin layer of oil all over. Nonstick pan (as I used) are more forgiving here, so you can use the lower amount. Heat the oil until it’s hot, another minute, then scatter half the rice over the surface it’s okay if small clusters remain. Season lightly with salt and do not touch it. In 3 to 5 minutes, the underside will become golden brown and crisp. Use a spatula to flip it in sections then fry on the other side until it is also crisp. Divide between two bowls and repeat with remaining rice, dividing it between two remaining bowls.

Crisp your egg: If there isn’t enough oil left in the pan (you want a thin layer), add another splash and heat this on high heat. Add eggs one at a time and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cook until brown, lacy, and crisp underneath, and the whites are opaque, bubbly and dramatic and the edges are brown. You can spoon some oil from the pan over the egg whites to help them cook faster. Place one egg on each bowl of rice.

Assemble bowls: Arrange some cucumbers and carrots to each bowl. Spoon 2 tablespoons vinaigrette onto each bowls. Drizzle each egg with a half-teaspoon of tamari and toasted sesame oil, letting it roll onto the other ingredients, plus hot sauce to taste. Eat immediately. Repeat frequently.

Do ahead: The dressing will keep for 5 to 6 days in the fridge the chopped vegetables will keep for 3 to 4.


Japanese vegetable pancakes

Last week was not my week in the kitchen, friends. I had great, ambitious designs on a rhubarb meringue tart that would be pink and pretty with a scalloped tart-shell edge and a meringue that looked like piped roses that had toasted petal tips. But as the week went on and as various really non-torments in the greater definition of the word but nonetheless tormenting to me mounted — thin curds, too thick curds, beige (you know, the color of pink rhubarb + multiple yolks) curd, slumped tart shells, wet meringues, useless broilers, blowtorches so close to empty, they emit the useless wisps of sleepy dragons, refill canister AWOL — my enjoyment of the project plummeted. But, because I’d like to teach my kid one day that he should follow through and finish what he started, I did, and lo, it was good, you know? Maybe I’m just not a meringue pie person and I forgot? None of this matters because the finished pie slid off the plate flopping face-down into the open fridge as I tried to put it away and then, as I crouched on the floor in front of the open fridge scooping fistfuls of meringue and curd into a garbage bag and questioning my life choices, my son walked in and asked what I was making for dinner.


I took a break from the kitchen after that. Sometimes, you just need some space, right? See if time apart restores that magic? Absence makes culinary ambitions grow fonder? Not to be clichéd or anything (cough, ugh), but I did go get a pedicure and while I was there an email appeared on my phone from Tasting Table extolling the virtues of the Japanese vegetable pancake known as okonomiyaki and all I wanted to do was run home and make it, immediately. That’s no small feat, considering the comfort of those massage chairs, and yet, if I were to wax philosophical for a moment, I would argue that this thing — when you think you’re done with cooking forever but see something new or different that’s so incredible, so doable, that you find all the minutes between then and when you’re finally able to get to the grocery store an irritant — is about the loftiest recipe goal there could be.




I actually got to making the pancakes a few days later, because life is like that, but please don’t wait so long because these are crazy delicious, filling and wholesome, as good as a side dish as they are as a main, topped with a fried egg. From what I can gather, there are many, many ways to make okonomiyaki and that this is by design — according to Wikipedia, the name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning “what you like” or “what you want.” What most have in common is a base of cabbage, flour, and egg, fried in a small or large fritter pancake form — can I call them Japanese latkes without offending anyone? Probably not, but there you are. From this base, only you are limited only by your imagination I’ve seen versions with everything from kimchi to shrimp or octopus, green onions or pork belly/bacon, but I kept with the relatively earnest version outlined in the newsletter, with cabbage, kale, carrots and scallions. While okonomiyaki is often made omelet-like and thick, served in wedges, it turns out I like mine the way I like my potato pancakes, which is for them to resemble a flying spaghetti monster that ran afoul of a hot skillet and crisped up on impact in all of its straggly glory — i.e. heavy on the vegetable, light on the batter, charred at the edges, tender in the center and absolutely impossible to stay irate at your kitchen long in the face of.


Japanese Vegetable Pancakes [Okonomiyaki] with Cabbage, Kale and Carrots
Adapted, just a little, from Josher Walker of Xiao Bao Biscuit, in Charleston, SC via Tasting Table

Okonomiyaki are traditional served squeeze with a generous criss-cross of Japanese mayonnaise and a okonomiyaki sauce, tangy-sweet-salty mixture I’d liken to Japanese barbecue sauce, which is sold in bottles but I attempted to cobble together a version from recipes I found online, below. Please forgive me if the flavor isn’t perfect I am new to it, but we loved it, just the same. Pancakes are then sprinkled with bonito flakes, seaweed flakes or even pickled ginger, but we enjoyed ours with a finely slivered scallion and toasted sesame seeds. I imagine they’d also be good with bites dipped in a simpler dumpling dipping sauce.

Yield: 4 large pancakes or I am really sorry, but I forgot to count, but I’d say at least 12, probably 14, smaller ones

Pancakes
1/2 small head cabbage, very thinly sliced (1 pound or 5 to 6 cups shreds) which will be easiest on a mandoline if you have one
4 medium carrots, peeled into ribbons with a vegetable peeler
5 lacinato kale leaves, ribs removed, leaves cut into thin ribbons
4 scallions, thinly sliced on an angle
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
6 large eggs, lightly beaten
Canola, safflower or peanut oil for frying

Tangy Sauce
1/4 cup ketchup
1 1/2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce (note: this is not vegetarian)
1/4 teaspoon dijon mustard
1 tablespoon rice cooking wine or sake
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon honey (use 2 if you like a sweeter sauce)
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

Make the pancakes: Toss cabbage, carrot, kale, scallions and salt together in a large bowl. Toss mixture with flour so it coats all of the vegetables. Stir in the eggs. Heat a large heavy skillet on medium-high heat. Coat the bottom with oil and heat that too.

To make a large pancake, add 1/4 of the vegetable mixture to the skillet, pressing it out into a 1/2- to 3/4-inch pancake. Gently press the pancake down flat. Cook until the edges beging to brown, about 3 minutes. 30 seconds to 1 minute later, flip the pancake with a large spatula. (If this is terrifying, you can first slide the pancake onto a plate, and, using potholders, reverse it back into the hot skillet.) Cook on the other side until the edges brown, and then again up to a minute more (you can peek to make sure the color is right underneath).

To make small pancakes, you can use tongs but I seriously find using my fingers and grabbing little piles, letting a little batter drip back into the bowl, and depositing them in piles on the skillet easier, to form 3 to 4 pancakes. Press down gently with a spatula to they flatten slightly, but no need to spread them much. Cook for 3 minutes, or until the edges brown. Flip the pancakes and cook them again until brown underneath.

Regardless of pancake size, you can keep them warm on a tray in the oven at 200 to 250 degrees until needed.

If desired, make okonomiyaki sauce: Combine all sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and let simmer for 3 to 5 minutes, until smooth and thick.

Serve pancakes with sauce and any of the other fixings listed above, from Japanese mayo to scallions and toasted sesame seeds.

Do ahead: Extra pancakes will keep in the fridge for a couple days, or can be spread on a tray in the freezer until frozen, then combined in a freezer bag to be stored until needed. Reheat on a baking sheet in a hot oven until crisp again.


Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs - Recipes

Double Layer Carrot Cake (sugar-free)
Adapted from Splenda.com serves as few or as many as you like

i'm certainly no sugar-free cook, but if you're into this sorta thing, this is a great launchpad. this cake doesn't taste sugar-free (unless, of course, a decadently sugar-laden carrot cake is alongside) and it's dense, but still moist. Serve at room temperature or warmed.

ingredients
Cake
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 T baking powder
1 T baking soda
1 t salt
4 t ground cinnamon
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 c canola oil
2/3 c 2% milk
2 T pineapple juice
2 t vanilla extract
2 c SPLENDA ® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
3 c shredded carrots (about 6 small)
1 c raisins
1/2 c chopped pecans
2 T flaked coconut

Frosting
2 (8 ounce) packages 1/3-less fat cream cheese, softened
½ c butter, softened
1 c SPLENDA ® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
2 t vanilla extract
1 T pineapple juice

instructions
Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly coat 2 9-inch round cake pans with cooking spray. Set aside.

Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl, stirring until blended. Set aside.

Combine eggs, canola oil, milk, pineapple juice, vanilla, and SPLENDA ® Granulated Sweetener. Add to dry ingredients, stirring just until blended. Fold in carrots, raisins, pecans and coconut. Spoon mixture into prepared pan (the mixture will appear much drier than most cakes, and you may have to 'smooth' the batter to cover the bottom of the pan since it isn't very runny).

Bake for 25 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

Meanwhile, beat cream cheese and butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add SPLENDA ® Granulated Sweetener, beating until light and fluffy. Add vanilla and pineapple juice, beating until blended.

If cake layers are rounded at the top, use a serrated knife to trim off some of the top. Frost the top of the bottom layer, then add the top layer and frost the remainder of the cake.


Wednesday, 26 March 2014

Mexican Rice Salad

This salad came out of a necessity to use up the ingredients. It was wonderfully tasty and packed full of veg. You could of course add in some chicken to make it meaty.

Mexican Rice Salad
(Serves 1)

50g brown rice
30g sweetcorn
1/2 tsp taco seasoning
30g cooked pinto beans
1/2 roasted red pepper, chopped
4 cherry tomatoes, halved
1/2 small avocado, chopped
1 tsp coriander, chopped

Bring a pan of water to the boil and cook the rice according to packet instructions adding the sweetcorn for the last 3-4 mins. Drain, run under the cold tap, drain again well.

Put the rice and sweetcorn into a bowl with the rest of the ingredients and stir well to combine. Pack into a lunchbox or serve.


Cauliflower Mac and Cheese

OK you may be getting the hint that I like caulilflower. But cauliflower rice, especially the pre-shredded, pre-frozen kind is SO easy. Here’s my recipe for cauli mac and cheese. This is one of my “Little Black Dress” meals. Meaning a meal I can make in 20 minutes on the fly and that it basically goes with any leftover protein – chicken, salmon, beans, jackfruit, even tofu. I also use the leftover cheese I have lying around from making the pizza so it rolls forward pretty easily into the next day!


Perfect any time of day, this Herbed Ricotta Tart gets a headstart by incorporating a refrigerated pizza crust dough. Dill and chives add fresh, fragrant flavor.

"I followed this recipe exactly and it was fabulous," praises sprater1. "Used fresh herbs from my garden. My kids (4 and 6 years old) loved it too!"


This super noodle ramen is like a massive hug in a bowl – using both dark and white miso paste, it gets the balance between sweet, hot, salty and sour spot on. Kale is roasted here for lovely crunch to finish off a hearty broth.

Embrace kale this winter and see how many more ways you can take this super-versatile and tasty green. You can learn more about the wonderful world of kale at the Vegepedia!


Beef and Turnip Pot Pie

Can we talk about turnips? Well, it's my blog so I guess the question is rhetorical. Turnips are a cool weather crop that typically grows well for the farmers who've supplied our farm share. What grows well you tend to get in plentiful amounts.


A decade ago, before I'd ever heard of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and when local eating was the tomatoes I'd grow each summer or the fruit we'd get at a 'let's take the kids, it'll be fun' pick your own outing, I rarely ate turnips. I had no recipes that called for turnips--but if rutabagas weren't available in the store when I wanted to make pasties I'd substitute a turnip.

A single turnip, a few times a year.

Now I get a bag of turnips at least a couple times a month at the beginning and the end of the CSA season when the cool weather crops are flourishing. [Let me put it this way--if you're getting tomatoes, peppers, and zucchini you're probably not getting turnips. All other times you're getting turnips.]

Instead of fighting the turnip, I'm embracing it's uniqueness. [Somewhat like my darling Robert Barker's uniqueness.] Sometimes the turnips stand alone, like in turnip pickles and turnip fritters. Most often, though, I combine turnips with meat or other vegetables. Sometimes I have failures, like the watery scalloped turnips and salami I shared on my FB page [I'm intrigued by Cindy's suggestion to brine turnip slices to draw out the moisture before cooking]. Other times I have a success, like this Beef and Turnip Pot Pie. This is a variation on my Beef & Bok Choy Pie, flavored similarly to a pasty but using ground, not cubed, beef.




You can find all of my turnip recipes in the Turnip Recipes Collection, part of the Visual Recipe Index by Ingredient. This is a resource for folks like me eating seasonally from the farm share, the farmer's market, or grocery store specials [not that I've ever seen turnips on special but you never know]. I've got turnip recipes pinned on Pinterest--you can follow me here. For more info on how to use this blog, click here.


Watch the video: Καυτερές πιπεριές με καρότο τουρσί