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How to Make Georgia Peanut-Fried Chicken

How to Make Georgia Peanut-Fried Chicken


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Master a new technique for creating a light and flavorful frying dredge with Chef Keith Schroeder’s recipe for Georgia Peanut-Fried Chicken from his new cookbook Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing.View Recipe: Georgia Peanut-Fried Chicken
Buy the Book: Mad Delicious

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Science teacher: Cookbook author Keith Schroeder tackles science behind cooking in ”Mad Delicious”

Cookbook author Keith Schroeder wants you to play with your food. And he doesn”t want you to follow his recipes. He wants you to learn from them.

Schroeder, who lives in Atlanta, is a veteran chef and former instructor at the New England Culinary Institute.

Schroeder, also the founder and CEO of High Road Craft Ice Cream, describes his new book, “Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Foods Taste Amazing” (Oxmoor House, Oct. 21, 2014 384 pages $35, hardcover), produced in collaboration with Cooking Light magazine, as a whirlwind culinary school in miniature. as a whirlwind culinary school in miniature.

The recipes are designed to teach readers fundamental principles of the kitchen. Schroeder starts with a chef”s first skill &mdash how to use a knife. For practice, make a delicious First-Cut Salsa Fresca.

Mastered blade basics? Time to try his Culinary School Chicken.

“I basically tried to jam an entire culinary school curriculum into one recipe,” Schroeder said.

In it, Schroeder teaches how to properly break down a whole bird, brown and roast it to perfection, then serve with gusto over a mirepoix of expertly diced carrots, onions and celery glazed with a rustic pan sauce. Seriously, don”t open this book when you”re hungry.

Alongside mouth-watering photographs and quirky illustrations, Schroeder explains the science behind each recipe. He describes the chemistry of emulsions and the physics of the sear. He tells you when you can swap apricots and peaches because one acid source is as good as another and how heavy cream can lighten up a vinaigrette.

Every ingredient in “Mad Delicious” comes with a “why,” and that”s important, chef Jack Bishop, executive director of America”s Test Kitchen, said in an interview with the Sentinel about the book. Modern people no longer pass their culinary knowledge from generation to generation, he said. Lacking years of experience beside a parent or grandparent, cooks need someone to tell them the “why.”

“Mad Delicious” may be scientific, but more than anything else, the book is fun. It reads like a chef buddy is standing next to you, a hand on your shoulder, offering friendly encouragement and helpful tips.

The book”s personality reflects Schroeder”s own hands-on learning style.

“I want to touch stuff, cook, play, screw stuff up,” he said. His message, he added, is simple: “Hey reader, let”s get cooking.”

Eric Carter, director of the culinary arts program at Cabrillo College, said Schroeder”s learn-by-doing approach is right on the money.

“You”re always learning when you”re cooking,” he said. “I can do the same recipe that I”ve done for years and see something I can do better every time.”

The ability to improvise marks the beginning of culinary instinct, Carter said. “If I don”t have this on hand, what can I substitute for it? What could I use instead of this to make it better?”

The scientific approach to cooking is timely, Schroeder said, because Americans have become as “sophisticated and soulful” about their food as Europeans, with their much longer culinary history.

“Folks shopping and eating today seem to be as competent as the people selling the food,” he said.

This increasing food sophistication is part of a decades-long trend worldwide, revered food writer Harold McGee said in an interview.

The author of the classic “On Food and Cooking” said “it used to be you kind of made use of what was available to you and cooked within your culture and social stratum.” Now, he said, “that”s just blown apart completely.”

Schroeder said he revels in the chance to interact with a more food-curious general public.

“It means we can all really be bold and have fun together,” said Schroeder. “The consumer, the author, everyone.”

Recipes

Georgia Peanut-Fried Chicken

J.C. and Jo Bell revolutionized peanut butter a few years back when they were charged with creating something amazing from America”s massive peanut surplus. PB2, a powdered peanut butter, is a culinary dream ingredient. Cut 50/50 with Wondra flour (it”s the superfine sugar of flours, see page 192), it makes for an unparalleled dredge for chicken. This dish retains the gentle sweetness of peanut, and has most of the crunch of true-to-form fried chicken.

8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs, about 1 pound: It”s a mouthfeel thing. This is fried chicken. It should be rich and unctuous. Thighs help that along.

1/2 cup, PB2 Powdered Peanut Butter: It”s neat. You can get it online, but both natural stores and mainstream supermarkets are catching on, too.

1/2 cup Wondra flour: It doesn”t clump, and it allows for a very even dredge.

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt: It”s fried chicken. You”re craving salt. Make sure you get all the dredge onto the chicken, as this is a small amount of added salt.

1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper: With the sweetness from the peanut butter, a little heat is welcome.

1 4 cup grapeseed oil, for frying: It”s neutral and has a fairly high smoke point. It”s great for frying.

• Place a wire rack over a sheet pan and set it aside. You”ll transfer your just-fried chicken here. None of this paper-towel stuff, please.

• Rinse the chicken thighs and pat them dry. Set aside on a plate.

• Combine the PB2, the Wondra, the salt, and the ground red pepper in a mixing bowl. Stir to mix all ingredients very evenly.

• In a small saut? pan, add the grapeseed oil. Raise heat to medium, and allow the oil to develop a look similar to the haze on a highway on a hot, steamy day. You know that look. It”s a bendy swirl.

• Now, lower the flame to medium-low. That should hold the heat steady (though you may have to teeter between low and medium-low, depending on the reliability of your stove and the thickness of your pan”s bottom).

• Sprinkle a tiny pinch of the flour mixture into the oil. If it sizzles, start cooking.

• Dredge the thighs in the PB2 mixture, one by one, before adding to the pan. Be sure to cook only one or two thighs at a time, otherwise you”ll crowd the pan, cool down the oil too quickly, and end up with soggy chicken. No one wants that.

• Cook for 4 minutes on each side. Then, using spring-loaded tongs, transfer the fully cooked chicken thighs to the elevated wire rack.

• Rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

Nutrition facts: CALORIES 355 FAT 23.3g (sat 3.8g, mono 6.3g, poly 11.7g) PROTEIN 25g CARB 12g FIBER 2g CHOL 74mg IRON 1mg SODIUM 248mg CALC 10mg

Bourbon-Steamed Peaches

No one”s complaining about peaches, bourbon, and sugar. This recipe allows you some practice with your steam-peeling technique and provides a little nip of whiskey if you don”t get it perfect the first time. This dish is amazing when turned into a browned butter blender sauce or when lightly fork-crushed alongside grilled meats or roasted chicken. It also makes a killer accompaniment to ice cream.

5 ripe peaches: Because you”ll mess one up the first time and will feel terrible giving someone the ugly peach. If you have extra, chop them coarsely and lay the pieces on each dish as a foundation for the other, beautifully peeled peach halves.

1 cup dark brown sugar: Use dark in this case, because we”ll actually be steaming with a simple syrup made from this sugar, and a little extra molasses kick is all the more delicious.

2 cups water: This is the precursor to steam.

1/2 cup bourbon: For aroma and depth of flavor.

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt: To enliven the nuances of the ripe peaches.

1 tablespoon lemon juice: A little acid balance makes for empty plates. Promise.

• Score the bottoms of each peach with a 1 2-inch “X.”

• In the pot that underlies your standard steamer configuration, combine the sugar, 2 cups water, bourbon, salt, and lemon. Go ahead and throw the halved lemon in the syrup for a little bitter punctuation if you are so inclined otherwise discard it.

• Bring the syrup to a full rolling boil.

• Place the peaches in the steamer basket, scored side up, and cover the steamer. Steam for 3 minutes, or until the peel starts to “open” up away from the score marks.

• Remove the steamer basket from the steamer configuration (leave the peaches in it), and set aside to cool for a few moments, until the peaches can be handled safely.

• Back at the stove, the syrup should be rolling away at a boil (and some lovely peach juices should have dripped into it).

• Over medium-high heat, reduce the syrup 5 minutes, until it coats the back of a spoon and is about the consistency of real maple syrup at room temperature.

• Turn off the syrup and let it rest.

• The peaches should be cool enough to peel. With clean hands, peel from the “X” toward the stem end of the peach. You should be able to remove the peel in 4 easy “fillets.”

• Using a paring knife, halve the peaches. Then tumble them in the syrup to coat.

• Serve the peaches, slightly warm or at room temperature, with about 2 tablespoons of the reduced syrup.

Nutrition facts: CALORIES 269 FAT 0.4g (sat 0g, mono 0.1g, poly 0.1g) PROTEIN 1g CARB 63g FIBER 2g CHOL 0mg IRON 0mg SODIUM 73mg CALC 9mg

Baja-Style Grilled Fish Tacos with Cabbage and Crema

Serves 4 (Serving size: 2 tacos)

Travel to San Diego, and you”ll find fish tacos everywhere, from gastropubs to quick service joints to celebrated restaurants. Hop the border into Mexico, hitting up Tijuana, Puerto Nuevo and Ensenada, and you”ll experience myriad opportunities to explore tortillas and Pacific Ocean fare. For this Baja-inspired recipe, it”s especially important to regulate heat, erring on the gentler side, as the mahimahi need sufficient time to firm up without charring too deeply. Be mindful about seasoning the grill grates and super-careful when turning. If you botch it the first time around, make sure to build the tacos strategically by blanketing your first-run grilled fish with perfectly shredded cabbage.

1/4 cup plain 2 percent Greek yogurt: This is the base of our homemade version of crema. A little acid works with the rub here.

1/4 cup light sour cream: Enriches the crema a bit.

2 tablespoons 1 percent milk: Thins the crema.

1 dried pasilla chile: Adds a rich, almost meaty chile flavor to the rub.

2 teaspoons brown sugar: The molasses flavor works with the chile and chars up beautifully (and quickly &mdash be mindful of the heat).

2 teaspoons canola oil: This is a shout-out to my mom. She always combined salt, sugar, and dry spices with oil as a pre-treatment to roasted and grilled things. It works.

1 2 teaspoon kosher salt: To contrast the sugar in the rub.

1 garlic clove, grated: Grating garlic helps ensure it sticks to the fish.

1 jalape?o pepper, grated: To evenly spike the flavor of the fillets.

2 mahimahi fillets (about 3 4-pound), deboned and skinned: It”s mellow-flavored and durable, a great choice for grilling.

Cooking spray: To keep the fish from sticking to the grill.

8 (6-inch) corn tortillas: The scent (and flavor) of masa, the corn dough that becomes a tortilla, is quintessentially Mexican.

3 tablespoons water: Keeps the tortillas from getting brittle on the grill.

2 cups white cabbage, finely shredded: As seen in Baja, California.

1 cup yellow onion, fine julienne: The bite of raw onion is a welcome contrast against all of the robust flavors.

1 tablespoon fresh cilantro leaves: Fresh to finish.

• In a small bowl, combine the yogurt, the sour cream, and the milk in a small bowl. Whisk to blend evenly. Cover and refrigerate.

• Heat a grill or grill pan to medium-high.

• Grind the pasilla chile in a food processor (or a coffee-type grinder designated for your spices and other non-coffee items). You should have 1 tablespoon of ground chile.

• In a medium bowl, combine the pasilla, the brown sugar, the canola oil, the salt, the garlic, and the jalape?o.

• Lay the fish fillets on a large plate or platter and massage on all sides with the pasilla mixture. Refrigerate while you season the grill.

• Spray a clean grill rag with cooking spray and rub the grill grates liberally. Repeat until the grill is well seasoned and ready to be kind to fish.

• Grill the fish fillets for about 4 minutes on each side, leaving it untouched and unturned during the first 4 minutes.

• Turn the fillets once and only once, or you”ll have fish bits everywhere. People will feel cheated when you try to hide massacred fillets in their tacos.

• Using a thin fish spatula, lift the fish gently from the grill and place on a platter.

• Now, brush the tortillas lightly with 3 tablespoons water and grill until marked and softened. This happens fast &mdash 30 seconds.

• Bundle them up in a clean tea towel and lay the bundle in a bowl or basket.

• Serve the fish on a platter with a large serving spoon. Present the fish alongside the tortillas, the cabbage, the cut limes, the onions, the salsa, the crema, and the fresh cilantro.

Nutritional facts: CALORIES 362 FAT 7.9g (sat 2g, mono 2.6g, poly 1.8g) PROTEIN 38g CARB 36g FIBER 6g CHOL 131mg IRON 3mg SODIUM 590mg CALC 162mg


Food Advertising by

Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing

Discover the delicious science behind healthy cooking! Too often, home cooks with good intentions sacrifice flavor and texture in an attempt to make their favorite recipes healthier. Mad Delicious shows readers how to maximize flavor and texture through 120 new recipes, witty and funny narrative, insight on 2015 James Beard Foundation Book Award Winner for Focus on Health

Discover the delicious science behind healthy cooking! Too often, home cooks with good intentions sacrifice flavor and texture in an attempt to make their favorite recipes healthier. Mad Delicious shows readers how to maximize flavor and texture through 120 new recipes, witty and funny narrative, insight on the nature of ingredients, and a fresh, innovative perspective on the science of cooking with illustrated explanations. The results are mad delicious!

Mad Delicious takes the kitchen science genre to the next level: It's not just about chemistry and molecules. Schroeder teaches home cooks about the nature of ingredients, how to maximize texture and flavor with clever cooking techniques (try steaming beef-then soaking it in wine sauce for the most tender steak ever!), smooth moves in the kitchen for better work flow, and how all the sciences-geography, meteorology, chemistry, physics, botany, biology, even human sociology and anthropology-can help home cooks master the science of light cooking.

Every recipe is a fun adventure in the kitchen resulting in mad delicious eats: Learn how to cook pasta like risotto for a silky sauce and enjoy Toasted Penne with Chicken Sausage. Other recipes include Lower East Side Brisket, Fish Sticks!, Cocoa-Crusted New York Strip, Georgia Peanut Fried Chicken, Red Sauce Joint Hero Sandwiches, Spicy Crab Fried Rice, Tandoori Chicken, and Bourbon Steamed Peaches. . more


Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing

Discover the delicious science behind healthy cooking! Too often, home cooks with good intentions sacrifice flavor and texture in an attempt to make their favorite recipes healthier. Mad Delicious shows readers how to maximize flavor and texture through 120 new recipes, witty and funny narrative, insight on the nature of ingredients, and a fresh, innovative perspective on the s.

Discover the delicious science behind healthy cooking! Too often, home cooks with good intentions sacrifice flavor and texture in an attempt to make their favorite recipes healthier. Mad Delicious shows readers how to maximize flavor and texture through 120 new recipes, witty and funny narrative, insight on the nature of ingredients, and a fresh, innovative perspective on the science of cooking with illustrated explanations. The results are mad delicious!

Mad Delicious takes the kitchen science genre to the next level: It's not just about chemistry and molecules. Schroeder teaches home cooks about the nature of ingredients, how to maximize texture and flavor with clever cooking techniques (try steaming beef-then soaking it in wine sauce for the most tender steak ever!), smooth moves in the kitchen for better work flow, and how all the sciences-geography, meteorology, chemistry, physics, botany, biology, even human sociology and anthropology-can help home cooks master the science of light cooking.

Every recipe is a fun adventure in the kitchen resulting in mad delicious eats: Learn how to cook pasta like risotto for a silky sauce and enjoy Toasted Penne with Chicken Sausage. Other recipes include Lower East Side Brisket, Fish Sticks!, Cocoa-Crusted New York Strip, Georgia Peanut Fried Chicken, Red Sauce Joint Hero Sandwiches, Spicy Crab Fried Rice, Tandoori Chicken, and Bourbon Steamed Peaches.

Keith is the author of Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing (Oxmoor House / Time Home Entertainment, October 2014). He also writes a monthly "Cooking Class" column for Cooking Light magazine.

Originally from Long Island, Keith Schroeder learned food by stepping outside of the kitchen with a commitment to roam neighborhoods, meet people, .

Keith is the author of Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing (Oxmoor House / Time Home Entertainment, October 2014). He also writes a monthly "Cooking Class" column for Cooking Light magazine.

Originally from Long Island, Keith Schroeder learned food by stepping outside of the kitchen with a commitment to roam neighborhoods, meet people, honor cooks, and try everything they put in front of him.

Keith became one of the youngest to be named executive chef of the New England Culinary Institute at age 28.

A chef for over 20 years, Keith started High Road Craft Ice Cream in 2010. His primary mission: to provide high-quality ice cream to chefs, restaurants, and hotels.

High Road's Bourbon Burnt Sugar is a Specialty Food Association sofi Award winner. High Road has also earned recognition from O Magazine, The New York Times, Travel + Leisure, Bon Appetit, Serious Eats, and Alton Brown’s “Alton Browncast.”

Keith’s most inspired cooking is done at his home in greater Atlanta with his wife and two teenage children.


Author: Stephanie Lyness
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 162
Release: 2015-12-10
ISBN 10: 9781626543713
ISBN 13: 1626543712
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Put your electric steamer to use like never before with Cooking with Steam. This is the original cookbook on electric steaming, and 20 years later it's still the bible of low-fat, full-flavor steamed food. Its hearty, delicious recipes will open your kitchen to a world of sublime flavors and nutritious meals. Some favorite recipes include Panzanella-Stuffed Artichokes with Porcini Mushrooms Salmon with Quick Basil Oil Shrimp with Black Beans and Mango Soy-Orange Marinated Chicken Cutlets and Duck Legs Steamed on a Bed of Thyme. For dessert try the irresistible Bittersweet Chocolate Pudding Cake or the Lemon Cheesecake. But perhaps best of all is the fact that all of these astounding dishes can be prepared quickly, with no mess or hassle. Using your electric steamer is as easy as can be. Just plug it in, add your choice of ingredients, set the timer, and walk away. There's no fussy temperature gauge to monitor, no need to worry about burning your food, and since everything happens inside the steamer, you're free to focus on other tasks while your dinner cooks-it's perfect for today's healthy, on-the-go lifestyle. And last but not least, what's not to love about the simple clean-up? No more scrubbing and scraping at burned saucepans, or overnight-soaking of casserole dishes, just a quick clean of the steamer basket before you get on with your evening. Steaming is an exciting and innovative technique for cooking meals that are both healthy and delicious. Revealing subtle flavors in your ingredients that are often masked by other fat-heavy preparations, steaming your food will provide you with astonishingly bright, clean-tasting meals, unattainable with any other cooking method. It's also a great way to highlight and preserve the freshness of your ingredients for a broad-range of easy and fulfilling dishes. Complete with timing charts and brand comparisons, Cooking with Steam is a comprehensive guide to delicious steamed meals for all occasions.


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The books nominated for this year&rsquos James Beard Awards take us on journeys both practical and philosophical, from the intricacies of humane butchering to the role of the Gerber Baby in the creation of modern America. Dive into the nominees below and try a new cuisine, consider a new cocktail, or discover a new way to look at food in the world around us. All nominated books are available at the James Beard Foundation Amazon store.

American Cooking

Heritage by Sean Brock (Artisan)
Gain insight into JBF Award winner Sean Brock&rsquos mission to preserve and promote the diverse bounty of his home region. Featuring recipes from his acclaimed restaurants, Husk and McCrady&rsquos, along with inspired takes on Southern standards like Pickled Shrimp and Hoppin&rsquo John, Heritage provides a glimpse into the mind of a chef devoted to American cuisine.

The New England Kitchen: Fresh Takes on Seasonal Recipes by Erin Byers Murray and Jeremy Sewall (Rizzoli New York)
With its celebrated farms and fisheries, New England offers so much more than clam chowder and Sam Adams. In this homage to the northeast, chef Jeremy Sewall explores the current state of New England cuisine, with more than one hundred vibrant recipes to take home cooks through the flavors of the region, season by season.


Texas on the Table: People, Places, and Recipes Celebrating the Flavors of the Lone Star State by Terry Thompson-Anderson (University of Texas Press)
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Della Fattoria Bread: 63 Foolproof Recipes for Yeasted, Enriched & Naturally Leavened Breads by Kathleen Weber (Artisan)
Homemade loaves straight from the oven can be yours, thanks to the masters at Della Fattoria, the award-winning Petaluma bakery that has won ardent fans across California&rsquos wine country. Founder Kathleen Weber provides tips and tricks for beginning bakers and bread-heads alike, recipes that incorporate the breads as ingredients, and stories from the bakery&rsquos history and the family behind it.

Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours by Alice Medrich (Artisan)
Dessert queen Alice Medrich is on a mission to prove that alternative flours are not just for those looking to avoid gluten. This exhaustive new work reveals the flavor-packed results of baking with grains like oats, rice, and sorghum, with nearly 125 recipes featuring Medrich&rsquos innovative techniques for taming the newest entrants to your baking repertoire.

Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails, with More than 500 Recipes by Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan (Ten Speed Press)
When it comes to craft cocktails, NYC's Death & Co. is one of the titans of the recent revolution, drawing serious drinkers since its inception in 2006. Featuring recipes from their much-lauded bar program, this book also serves as a crash-course of cocktailing, as well as a reference guide for aspiring mixologists.

Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail by Dave Arnold (W. W. Norton & Company)
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Never Trust a Skinny Italian Chef by Massimo Bottura (Phaidon Press)
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Relæ: A Book of Ideas by Christian F. Puglisi (Ten Speed Press)
Visitors to Copenhagen&rsquos Relæ are asked to forget all preconceived notions of fine dining, and readers of its titular new tome will find themselves facing a similar challenge. The book forgoes the typical structure for a series of interconnected essays on the philosophy behind founder Christian Puglisi&rsquos wildly inventive cooking, creating a reading experience as unique as a meal at the restaurant.


Focus on Health


A Change of Appetite: Where Healthy Meets Delicious by Diana Henry (Mitchell Beazley)
What happens when one of Britain&rsquos best-loved food writers starts to crave healthier fare? A compendium of lighter, fresher recipes that crisscross the globe and push readers&rsquo palates into new territory to prove that healthy eating is far from bland or boring.

Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing by Keith Schroeder (Oxmoor House)
The science of healthy cooking isn&rsquot just about nutrition, as shown in Keith Schroeder&rsquos witty, illustrated guide to maximizing flavor and texture in the kitchen. With seemingly decadent recipes like Georgia Peanut Fried Chicken and Lower East Side Brisket lightened up through Schroeder&rsquos unique techniques and explanations of the nature of ingredients, each chapter provides a new adventure in improving your diet and your palate.

Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans by Henry Fong and Michelle Tam (Andrews McMeel Publishing)
The Stone-Age savants behind the wildly popular Nom Nom Paleo cooking blog have unleashed their unadulterated fare on the masses, with more than 100 recipes void of grains, legumes, and added sugar. Not just for the Crossfit set, this book introduces readers to the Paleo lifestyle, providing clean takes on familiar dishes like Chicken Nuggets and Yankee Pot Roast, in the hopes of giving cooks a new perspective on what the kitchen has to offer.


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Visitors to the Kitchn&rsquos website know they can count on it as a resource for recipes, cooking advice, ingredient information, home design, and more. Thankfully, the Kitchn&rsquos new cookbook is just as wide-ranging and informative, offering recipes, essential how-tos, and organizational tips to make the kitchen one of your favorite places to be.

Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home by Marcus Samuelsson with Roy Finamore (Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
Somehow, between managing his restaurant empire, judging Chopped, and competing on shows such as Top Chef Masters (where he was crowned champion), JBF Award winner Marcus Samuelsson still finds time to cook at home. This new cookbook shares some of his favorite dishes from his home kitchen, from Coconut-Lime Curried Chicken to Mac, Cheese, and Greens, revealing a flavor repertoire just as eclectic as the chef behind the apron.


Saveur: The New Classics Cookbook by The Editors of Saveur (Weldon Owen)
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Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition by David Sterling (University of Texas Press)
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Photography


In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World by Gabriele Galimberti (Clarkson Potter)
Gabriele Galimberti&rsquos collection of intimate portraits reveal that a grandmother&rsquos cooking is infused with love no matter where on Earth she is. Featuring grandmothers and their signature dishes from over sixty countries, In Her Kitchen is a powerful argument for the connection between food and family, and the universal ties that hold all humanity together.

A New Napa Cuisine, Photographer: Jen Munkvold and Taylor Peden (Ten Speed Press)
The Napa Valley has called to chefs and gourmands alike for decades, drawing them in with its verdant hills and wealth of agricultural treasures. A New Napa Cuisine is a celebration of all things local, from producers to artisans, to the wild plants waiting to be foraged, and is a tribute to the influence of that terroir on American cooking as a whole.

Sherry: A Modern Guide to the Wine World's Best-Kept Secret, with Cocktails and Recipes, Photographer: Ed Anderson (Ten Speed Press)
Sherry, until recently an oft-maligned and misunderstood wine, is making a cultural comeback. Discover the rich history of one of Spain&rsquos oldest and greatest winemaking traditions through this comprehensive guide, featuring background on the different styles of sherry, a thorough buyer&rsquos guide listing top producers, and recipes for sherry-based cocktails and food pairings.


Reference and Scholarship


Butchering Poultry, Rabbit, Lamb, Goat, and Pork: The Comprehensive Photographic Guide to Humane Slaughtering and Butchering by Adam Danforth (Storey Publishing)
Aspiring butchers and curious carnivores alike will devour this engaging, step-by-step photographic guide to the means and methods of humane animal slaughter and animal breakdown. Covering food safety through freezing and packaging, this comprehensive reference leaves nothing to chance.

Inventing Baby Food: Taste, Health, and the Industrialization of the American Diet by Amy Bentley (University of California Press)
Is there a substance more emblematic of the modern American diet than baby food? As Amy Bentley explores through her new book, Inventing Baby Food, though it was virtually nonexistent at the turn of the twentieth century, by the 1950s commercial baby food had come to represent postwar America&rsquos efficiency, convenience, and industry, and continues to influence our culture even today.

The Spice & Herb Bible (Third Edition) by Ian and Kate Hemphill (Robert Rose)
Global flavors don&rsquot have to be off-limits to home cooks, thanks to this authoritative guide to the wide world of herbs and spices This new edition features six new spice entries, over a hundred new recipes, and fifty new spice blends, along with anecdotes and advice from Ian Hemphill&rsquos lifelong experience in the spice industry.

Single Subject


Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes by Jennifer McLagan (Ten Speed Press)
Americans love their salty potato chips and sweet doughnuts, but the recent rise of crafts beers, dark chocolate, and cocktails with Campari and absinthe suggests we may be starting to appreciate the appeal of bitter foods. In this extensive exploration of the history, culture, and science of this oft-maligned flavor, McLagan argues for its rightful inclusion in our collective kitchen.

Charcutería: The Soul of Spain by Jeffrey Weiss (Agate Surrey)
Discover the delicious, time-honored tradition of Spanish charcuterie with this robust collection of recipes, anecdotes, and curing-techniques that will make you a chorizo champion and a master of morcilla in no time.

Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World's Most Versatile Ingredient by Michael Ruhlman (Little, Brown and Company)
When guru of gastronomy Michael Ruhlman tackles a topic, you know no stone will go unturned. In his latest innovative cookbook, Ruhlman explains that the egg forms the crux of good cooking, taking readers through nearly every conceivable application, from boiling to batters and beyond.

Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian


At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well by Amy Chaplin (Roost Books)
Vegetarians and omnivores alike will delight in Amy Chaplin&rsquos guide to living the whole food lifestyle. Filled with insights into ingredients, tips for composting, guides to cleansing, and of course, a collection of produce-forward recipes (including desserts), Chaplin sets readers on a path to clean and healthy living, day by day.

Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London's Ottolenghi by Yotam Ottolenghi (Ten Speed Press)
It&rsquos hard to imagine culinary superstar Yotam Ottolenghi topping the success of his groundbreaking Plenty, but his followup Plenty More does just that, offering 150 new flavor-packed vegetarian recipes displayed in visually stunning photographs. From salads to sweets, Ottolenghi provides his unique perspective to yet again challenge all you know about vegetarian cuisine.

Vegetarian Dinner Parties: 150 Meatless Meals Good Enough to Serve to Company by Mark Scarbrough and Bruce Weinstein (Rodale Books)
Facing a dinner party with nary a meat-eater in sight? Never fear&mdashwith this creative collection of mouthwatering modern vegetarian and vegan recipes, you&rsquoll soon be serving up a menu that will have even the most ardent carnivores clamoring for more.

Writing and Literature


The Chain: Farm, Factory, and the Fate of Our Food by Ted Genoways (HarperCollins Publishers)
This mesmerizing exposé reveals the harrowing details of life on the meatpacking production line. Thanks to exclusive interviews with workers from a notoriously tight-lipped industry, acclaimed journalist Ted Genoways uncovers the dangerous and horrifying consequences of America&rsquos desire for meat.

The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu by Dan Jurafsky (W. W. Norton & Company)
Why is the star of our Thanksgiving menu named after a country on the Mediterranean? How did a fish sauce from China become our favorite dip for French fries? Linguist Dan Jurafsky delves into these questions and more to show that the way we talk about food may be just as important as how those foods taste.

The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food by Dan Barber (Penguin Press)
In this redefining look at the future of food in America, renowned chef and advocate Dan Barber challenges us to reshape our eating habits in favor of the &ldquothird plate,&rdquo an intersection of good farming and good food. Barber argues that farm-to-table simply isn&rsquot enough, and to really save our planet and our cuisine, we need a revolution on the field, in the factory, and of our beliefs.

Maggie Borden is assistant editor at the James Beard Foundation. Find her on Twitter and Instagram.


The petite pig

it's a known fact that the chinese love fried chicken. if you don't believe me, buy yourself a ticket to any somewhat urban town in china where colonel sanders has become this generation's chairman mao. statues, pictures and other propaganda of the fried chicken master line the new streets of china and the chinese pay respect to their new leader by eating fried chicken by the tons there are afterall 1.1 billion of us just on the mainland.

the dangs, in line with the stereotype, also have a great love affair with fried chicken. we were personally partial to popeye's. on occasions when mom would allow us the luxury of western food, we'd pick up a twenty piece box (no white meat please), a side of cajun fries and half a dozen biscuits. my brother and i had no problem devouring every last morsel left in that grease-soaked paper box.

but now, i'm a little bit wiser, a little bit older and a lot more of a food snob so the thought of entering a fast food chain sounds less than appetizing, even it is for fried chicken. so, over the past year and a half, i've been digging deep into my southern roots (maryland is south of the maxon-dixon line) to find that perfect fried chicken recipe.

there are two criteria for judging fried chicken: 1) the juiciness factor and 2) the crispiness factor. the meat must be juicy the skin must be crispy (charred burnt skin does not count). to achieve this we must get two things right: 1) marination and 2) oil temperature.

lets talk marination first. some people mistake sprinkling some salt & pepper on a piece of meat for marination. what you're actually doing is seasoning, not marinating. i marinate the chicken i use with both wet and dry ingredients: lots of buttermilk and a simple poultry spice mix. this should be done the night before, giving the chicken time to soak up all those flavors overnight.

and now oil temperature. the temperature of your oil is the most important factor in deep frying food. it's what'll determine if your fried chicken meets the juiciness and crispiness criteria. when using some sort of breading, like for fried chicken, you are essentially creating a shield. this shield crisps and browns giving us our crispy, rich-colored skin and also serves to form a seal to steam the meat that lies below giving us our juicy meat. if the temperature of the oil is too high, your skin will burn if it's too low, the oil will start to penetrate through that skin giving us greasy chicken, which is a big no-no.

so, what's the perfect temperature? about 375 degrees. after you put your first batch of chicken into the hot oil, you'll see that the temperature drops because the temperature of the chicken will cool down the oil. it's therefore important to bring that oil back to 375 between each batch of chicken.

now that you know my keys to fried chicken, heat up that cast iron skillet and get frying.

the juiciest fried chicken
serves 8

general ingredients:
2 whole chickens
1/2 gallon of peanut oil

for marinade:
3 tbs. kosher salt
1/2 tbs. black pepper
2 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. sugar
2 cups buttermilk

for breading:
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tbs. salt
1 tsp. cayenne pepper
2 tsp. garlic powder

special equipment:
cast-iron skillet
deep-fry thermometer

the night before: cut up chickens into fry-able pieces. for those of you who have never taken apart a whole chicken, gourmetsleuth offers a great photo how-to. place cut up chicken pieces into a 9" x 13" pyrex glass pan. mix together dry marinade ingredients and rub liberally over the chicken pieces. don't be afraid to get your hands dirty reaching into all those hard-to-reach places of the chicken. pour buttermilk over chicken, making sure all pieces of chicken are soaked in buttermilk. cover pan with saran wrap and place in refrigerator overnight.

one to two hours before frying: take pan of chicken out of fridge to give it some time to rise to room temperature. make sure the pan is still tightly sealed to prevent any escape of raw chicken bacteria!

and now for the frying!: fill up cast-iron skillet with peanut oil, 1 1/2 inch deep. heat oil steadily over medium heat until it reaches 375 degrees on your deep-fry thermometer.

while the oil is heating, mix together breading ingredients in a bowl. dredge chicken in flour mixture and lay out onto parchment lined baking sheet until oil's ready.

once oil is hot enough, place about 4 chicken pieces into skillet. fry about 6 minutes on each side (dark meat may take a little bit longer, about 8 minutes on each side). let temperature of oil rise back to 375 degrees before frying up the next batch. when all pieces are fried up, let oil cool and empty remaining oil into a container (i always keep a few empty glass jars from pasta sauces and such lying around just for this purpose) and toss in the garbage. emptying grease in your sink will result in some major unwanted pipe clogging.

s erve with a side of mashed potatoes, some sauteed sugar snapped peas and a sweet cornbread biscuit for a truly southern experience.


Chicken

Chicken by Chase Night Summary

Casper Quinn has a secret. Brant Mitchell has two. Hickory Ditch, Arkansas – July 2012 Popular fried chicken chain Wings of Glory is under attack from homosexual activists, and Harvest Mission Pentecostal Church is ready to fight back. Caught in the crossfire of a culture war in which they never enlisted, Casper and Brant will each have to find his own answer to the age-old question: Am I really what I eat? Because if they could find the courage to tell each other their truths, they might discover there really is life after the Ditch. CHICKEN is a Southern Gothic YA novel with an infusion of magical realism. It’s a raw, honest, sometimes funny, sometimes poignant look at falling in love in a place where angels and demons are believed in without question, but the human heart is always subject to suspicion.