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Latest E. Coli Culprit: Alfalfa Sprouts

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Outbreak in Michigan, Wisconsin has sickened 9 people

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Don't eat alfalfa sprouts from Jack & the Green Sprouts, per the CDC.

Alfalfa sprouts are behind the latest E. coli outbreak, making nine people ill in Michigan and Wisconsin, CNN reports. Per a CDC announcement issued Thursday, the affected sprouts originated from Jack & the Green Sprouts in River Falls, Wis., and caused two of the sickened individuals to be hospitalized. 8; those affected are between the ages of 17 and 84 and are mostly women. The CDC report notes this outbreak doesn't appear to be tied to a salmonella outbreak traced earlier this week to alfalfa sprouts from Sweetwater Farms in Kansas. Both outbreaks have led NPR to ask about this much-touted health food: "Should sprouts come with a warning label?"

This article was originally published by Jenn Gidman,on February 26, 2016

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Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


Morbitopia

It’s been a long time since the last update. I’ve been wallowing in poo and worms since I last checked in…well, not so much IN poo and worms, but I’ve been busy writing a thesis paper about poo and worms. Eventually, it will provide a lot of topic for this blog, but until then, we are back to keeping up to date with the news in all that is infectious and weird in human and animal public health.

Plague…it’s not just a disease from the middle ages. During the summer of 2014, a dog in Colorado was ill, exhibiting weakness and eventually coughing up blood. After the owner and a close friend developed similar symptoms, additional testing was done and the culprit was eventually discovered: Yersinia pestis. Two veterinary technicians who had cared for the dog during its illness developed milder symptoms and were also diagnosed and treated. The pulmonic form of plague, where the bacteria is present in respiratory secretions and blood, is especially dangerous because the bacteria can become airborne and spread to other humans and animals. Public health officials note that this is the first case of human-to-human spread of plague since 1924 they also note that in 2012 a Denver girl developed bubonic plague after contact with a dead squirrel. Usually, plague is spread by fleas which are infected after feasting on rodents which carry the disease. In regions where Y. pestis is present in wildlife, experts advise to protect yourself and your pets by using widely available flea products to prevent flea bites. If you or your pet develop flu-like or respiratory symptoms shortly after contact with wild rodents (especially prairie dogs), public health officials recommend seeking medical attention.

Goat plague, aka Ovine Rinderpest or PPR (that’s French, don’t ask me for a translation!), is a viral disease that causes hemorrhagic respiratory disease or acute death in small ruminants. This morbillivirus, related to Canine Distemper and human measles, apparently evolved in the early 20th century on the African continent. There is an increasing world-wide demand for sheep and goat meat as a source of protein, especially in least-developed countries. Goat plague takes an economic toll, as well, not only as a lost income source for livestock producers, but it also decreases food supplies, driving up prices for already disadvantaged consumers. The FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the UN) is hoping to promote awareness of goat plague and to eradicate this disease, which is readily controlled with inexpensive and effective vaccines.

First graders on a field trip in Washington state developed E. coli infections after visiting a dairy exhibit. Unfortunately, it is difficult to balance exposure to pathogens with exposure to learning opportunities this is a public health topic that needs to be studied more closely. The CDC and many health departments have produced some excellent materials to educate children on hand-washing, which is the best way to prevent hand-to-mouth transmission of many diseases. Parents of children going on field trips need to be advised of possible exposures and symptoms for which to be on the lookout. Fortunately, it looks like all of the children affected are on the way to recovery.

Aldicarb (aka Temik or “Tres Pasitos”) is an insecticide that is a favorite with poachers and people who want to intentionally poison animals. Several animals (including 3 dogs, a coyote, a skunk and a raccoon) in Wyoming were recently poisoned with this compound, according to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab, and BLM has offered a $2000 reward for help leading to the culprits. I wrote a risk assessment paper about Aldicarb poisoning in dogs I’ll post a link for those who would like to know more about this toxin.

The country of Colombia has released its latest figures for chikungunya infections. Public health officials reported that over 180,000 cases of infection and 25 deaths have been confirmed due to this mosquito-borne virus another 17 deaths are under investigation. Although rarely fatal, this alphavirus (related to eastern and western equine encephalitis) causing debilitating joint pain and neurologic signs.

Scientists in Sweden think they have found a link between hyperthyroidism in cats and flame-retardants. The study, which looked at the levels of PBDEs (or polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in the blood of cats with and without hyperthyroidism, suggested there may be a link. These scientists note that their study does not show that PBDEs cause this glandular disease in cats, only that there may be an association.


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